Two rolls with a box camera

I’ve blogged before about the Coronet Twelve-20, a simple box camera from about 1950, which I purchased for the grand sum of £1.

L1180867

Recently I put two rolls of film through the camera – one Ilford Pan-F and one Fuji Acros. Both were expired rolls which I picked up at an antiques shop  (I managed to resist the temptation to buy several cameras they had for sale). I don’t shoot expired film too much because I usually like a degree of certainty about the outcome, but I bought these specifically for use in the box camera, as I knew that image quality was qoing to be distinctly vintage anway, and the one stop of speed loss needed (they expired about 10 years ago) would put them closer to the slow films the camera was designed for.

The first roll was shot at North Shields Fish Quay with Ilford Pan F+.

2018-8-30, Fish Quay, Coronet 12-Twenty, PanF, HC110 Dil E 17C 7m30s, 3_

I really like the fact that only the centre of the image is remotely in focus. This character sets the box camera images apart from my usual stuff. If I wanted ultimate quality I could shoot medium or large format.

2018-8-30, Fish Quay, Coronet 12-Twenty, PanF, HC110 Dil E 17C 7m30s, 2 _

A member of the filmwasters forum said he had the same camera and his images were more in focus. This made me wonder whether the soft edges were due to excessive curling of the negs when scanned, as they were very curly. I’ve had the negatives flattening between books with a view to rescanning and comparing them – but to be honest I’m hoping that’s not the reason !

2018-30 Coronet 9

2018-30 Coronet 122018-30 Coronet 13

The second roll was shot on a walk round Durham with the Fuji Acros:

Coronet Acros CP 1Box camera view of DurhamCoronet Acros CP 5Coronet Acros CP 7Coronet Acros CP 8Coronet Acros CP 9Coronet Acros CP 11

The last image of the roll was taken at Saltburn:

Coronet Acros CP 10

I’ve enjoyed using this basic camera, with it’s single shutter speed, two apertures, no focus control, and tape around the edges to reduce light leaks.

 

 

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